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David David

David

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David last won the day on May 22

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  1. If you've ever gone without sleep for an extended period, you will know it isn't exactly a good idea. Even one night of broken sleep can cause problems the next day - and there can be few things worse than not getting enough shut-eye for weeks on end. But while lack of sleep is undoubtedly bad for you, the jury's out as to how bad. We know it can cause a litany of health problems, both on a short and long-term basis. What is harder to determine is - can it kill you? Click below to read more: Can you die from lack of sleep? PATIENT.INFO We know insomnia can cause a litany of health problems, both on a short and long-term basis. What is harder to determine is - can it kill you?
  2. Who hasn't experienced the blessed relief of scratching an itch? Everyone itches now and again, usually due to insect bites, eczema, allergy, or irritation from something they've touched. But occasionally itching can be a sign of more serious illness - so how can you tell the difference? Common causes of itching Itching is a symptom, not a medical condition. It's usually caused by a stimulus in your skin. For instance, with insect bites you're reacting to the saliva injected at the site of the bite. With nits, you can develop an allergy to the head lice (the itching isn't due to them biting). If a local cause is to blame, you'll usually have a rash. Click below to read more: Causes of itchy skin and how to treat it | Skin itching PATIENT.INFO Everyone itches now and again, usually due to insect bites, eczema, allergy, or irritation from something they've touched. But occasionally itching can be a sign of more serious illness.
  3. Eye floaters are usually thought of as a nuisance rather than a chronic condition. But for some people, they can significantly affect the quality of life. So how do you learn to live with them - and what are the treatment options? Last summer, David, 24, was cycling through his hometown when what looked like a giant, magnified tapeworm appeared in his central vision, against the blue sky. It was accompanied by strange shadows, which looked to him like fast-moving mosquitoes, dark smudges and lines. Despite their appearance, these were not parasites. David had developed severe vitreous opacities, otherwise known as eye floaters. Click below to read more: How to get rid of eye floaters PATIENT.INFO Eye floaters are usually thought of as a nuisance rather than a chronic condition. But for some people they can significantly affect quality of life. How do you get rid of them?
  4. If you're dealing with depression or anxiety, you're probably aware of the recommendation to be more active. With our minds and bodies powerfully connected, physical activity can have an immediate impact on a person's overall sense of well-being. This is due in part to changes that take place in the brain during exercise. The so-called 'runner's high' is caused by a potent cocktail of hormones - possibly including a neurotransmitter called anandamide, from the Sanskrit word for 'bliss'. On top of this, staying active is likely to boost self-esteem, serve as a distraction from negative thought spirals, and improve your quality of sleep. Click below to read more: Does exercise help depression? PATIENT.INFO With our minds and bodies powerfully connected, physical activity can have an immediate impact on a person’s overall sense of wellbeing.
  5. If a friend or family member is given a terminal diagnosis, it's natural to want to support them. But many of us are scared of saying the wrong thing. We look at potential pitfalls. Don't ask 'How are you?' For most of us, asking someone how they're feeling is a natural conversation opener, and we probably don't even think about the significance of the words. But asking this question when someone is seriously ill can cause undue stress. Click below to read more: What not say to someone who is dying | How to talk about terminal illness PATIENT.INFO If a friend or family member is told they are going to die, it’s natural to want to support them. But many of us are scared of saying the wrong thing. We look at what to say to someone with a terminal illness.
  6. Nobody wants to live in pain, and fortunately these days we have effective treatments for most of the many different types of pain. But many of them carry a risk of serious addiction if you take them for too long. How do you know if you’re addicted, and what can you do? We all have a picture in our minds of heroin addicts, usually sad homeless people who live only for their next 'fix'. But most people don't realise that painkillers we can buy from our chemists can cause addiction too. Click below to read more: Should you worry about painkiller addiction? PATIENT.INFO Many painkillers carry a risk of serious addiction if you take them for too long. How do you know if you’re addicted, and what can you do?
  7. We're all familiar with the metaphor 'my heart skipped a beat' - used to describe a moment of shock or excitement. But what happens when our heart really does seem to miss a beat, flutter or change rate for a moment? Heart palpitations are more common than you might think. We look at the symptoms, causes and when to seek help. Am I having a heart attack? One of the first things we might wonder when experiencing palpitations is whether we're having a heart attack. However, the symptoms of a heart attack are usually quite different. Click below to read more: What causes heart palpitations - and when should you worry? PATIENT.INFO Heart palpitations are more common than you might think. We look at the symptoms, causes and when to seek help.
  8. One in four of us will experience a mental health issue such as depression in our lifetime – even if you’re not affected, the chances are someone close to you may be. This could a friend, family member, your partner, or a colleague. ‘There’s still a lot of stigma around talking about mental health, particularly in the workplace, and men often find it particularly difficult to say they’re depressed,’ says psychologist Emma Kenny. Click below to read more: How to support someone with depression | Mental Health and Relationships PATIENT.INFO One in four of us will experience a mental health issue in our lifetime – even if you’re not affected, the chances are someone close to you may be.
  9. Everyone might experience them from time to time, but the causes behind pins and needles aren't always down to lying awkwardly on an arm or leg. Here's a relatively boring personal revelation: ever since I can remember, I have preferred going to sleep on my side, tucking my arm underneath the pillow with my head resting on top. Those who share the same nocturnal idiosyncrasy will be familiar with that odd sensation upon waking: that numb, tingling feeling spanning the respective arm and hand as if one's limbs are on loan to an entirely different body. Click below to read more: What causes pins and needles - and when should you worry? PATIENT.INFO Everyone might experience them from time to time, but the causes behind pins and needles aren't always down to lying awkwardly on an arm or leg.
  10. Psoriasis affects approximately 1.8 million people in the UK, around 2% of the population. Red, flaky patches of skin covered in silvery scales are typical of the condition, which comes and goes throughout life. Its frequency and severity can vary greatly from person to person, from causing minor irritation to seriously affecting their quality of life. Psoriasis causes inflammation and increases the production of skin cells. Rather than being replaced every 3-4 weeks, skin cells are replenished in 3-7 days, causing characteristic plaques often found on the knees, elbows, scalp and lower back (although they can appear anywhere on the body). Click below to read more: How psoriasis triggers depression - and how to stop it getting you down PATIENT.INFO Psoriasis affects 2% of the population. For some people, psoriasis seriously affects their quality of life.
  11. When you have limited mobility, keeping fit and active can feel more difficult, but it doesn't have to be this way. Here are some simple expert tips on how to improve your fitness if you are disabled. Physically disabled people make up a fifth of Britain's population, almost 14 million people, but they are currently the least active group in society. According to Sports England, disabled people are twice as likely to be inactive as able-bodied people. This is despite a recent report that found that 83% of people with a physical disability would like to be more active and think it's important. Click below to read more: How to exercise if you have a physical disability PATIENT.INFO When you have limited mobility, keeping fit and active can feel more difficult, but it doesn’t have to be this way. Here are some simple expert tips on how to improve your fitness if you are disabled.
  12. Each year, 6,000 more people with dementia will face living alone in towns and cities across the UK, according to Alzheimer’s Society. The dementia charity says there are currently roughly 120,000 people living alone with dementia in the UK – a number predicted to double by 2039. But public awareness of people with dementia living alone seems low. A new YouGov poll revealed that 85% of people believe they’re most likely to meet someone with dementia in a care home, when in fact two-thirds of people with dementia live in the community. Click below to read more: Tackling loneliness in dementia – Which? News WWW.WHICH.CO.UK More and more people are predicted to be living alone with dementia over the next 20 years. We explore the problem, and how you can live well with dementia.
  13. Nine years after I first received it, I do not only keep the following SMS as a souvenir. I use it as a reminder of one of the lowest points in my life, and my subsequent determination to overcome it. “I think loneliness creates a void; a void that comes from deep down your soul. It changes you; it steals away your happiness. It brings a constant sadness that’s only seen when you smile because the smile does not reach your eyes. Only when you fill the void, can you fully enjoy living; I feel as if I am intruding in your life. I have no idea, what part, if any I should play. Click below to read more: Let us answer the question ‘are you alone, or lonely?’ Beware the monster of loneliness. - New Era Live NEWERALIVE.NA Nine years after I first received it, I do not only keep the following SMS as a souvenir. I use it as a reminder of one of the lowest points in my life, and my subsequent determination to overcome it.
  14. The Deptford based food redistribution charity FareShare has joined forces with The British Red Cross and the Co-op to tackle loneliness in London. The initiative aims to provide 400 new community groups that could benefit from fresh, in-date surplus food - bringing people together at the same time. Rachel Ledwith from Fareshare and Michael Ochwa is from The British red cross, they spoke to Anthony Baxter. Click below to watch the video: Food redistribution charity tackles loneliness in London | London Live WWW.LONDONLIVE.CO.UK The initiative aims to provide 400 new community groups that could benefit from fresh, in-date surplus food - bringing people together at the same time
  15. I suppose I’m lonely,” she said. “Yes, that’s the word. I’m lonely and I never thought I would be. I never thought I’d feel so alone.” We were sitting at an outside table in a cafe in the park. The sun had made an appearance after a monsoon week and we had arranged to meet, a friend and I, for a long-planned walk. “I didn’t know you were feeling lonely,” I said. “Nobody knows. You can’t tell by looking at me. I’m not talking to the trees. I haven’t started pushing my life around the streets in a supermarket trolley, swigging fortified sherry out of the bottle.” “I didn’t think to wander the streets necking bottles of sherry was a particular signifier of loneliness.” Click below to read more: ‘I suppose I’m lonely,’ she said. ‘Lonely and I never thought I would be’ WWW.IRISHTIMES.COM Hilary Fannin: Don’t tell me to take up a sport. Especially golf, said my lonely friend
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